British Standards

CCTV

Intruder Alarms

Access Control

BS EN 50132-7:1996 European Standard for CCTV Systems

EN 50132-7:1996

Introduction

The purpose of this standard is to provide guidance to ensure that closed circuit television (CCTV) systems, functions and their performances are fully met.

This standard will prove useful to those responsible for establishing operational requirements, writing specifications, selecting, installing, commissioning, using and maintaining a CCTV System.

Closed circuit television, in its simplest form, is a means of providing images from a television camera for viewing on a monitor via a private transmission system.  There is no theoretical limit to the number of cameras and monitors which may be used in CCTV surveillance installation but in practice this will be limited by the efficient combination of control and display equipment and the operator’s ability to manage the system.

The successful operation of a CCTV system requires the active co-operation of the user in carrying out the recommended procedures.

Scope

This standard gives recommendations for the selection, planning and installation of close circuit television systems comprising of camera (s) with monitor (s) and/or video recorder (s), switching, control and ancillary equipment for use in security applications.

The objectives of this standard are:

a)     To provide a framework to assist customers, installers and users in establishing their requirements;

b)     To assist specifiers and users in determining the appropriate equipment required for a given application;

c)      To provide means of evaluating objectively the performance of an installed system.

Email us at office@platinumsec.co.uk or visit www.platinumsec.co.uk  for further information.

 

BS EN 50132-7:1996 European Standard for CCTV Systems

EN 50132-7:1996

Introduction

The purpose of this standard is to provide guidance to ensure that closed circuit television (CCTV) systems, functions and their performances are fully met.

This standard will prove useful to those responsible for establishing operational requirements, writing specifications, selecting, installing, commissioning, using and maintaining a CCTV System.

Closed circuit television, in its simplest form, is a means of providing images from a television camera for viewing on a monitor via a private transmission system.  There is no theoretical limit to the number of cameras and monitors which may be used in CCTV surveillance installation but in practice this will be limited by the efficient combination of control and display equipment and the operator’s ability to manage the system.

The successful operation of a CCTV system requires the active co-operation of the user in carrying out the recommended procedures.

Scope

This standard gives recommendations for the selection, planning and installation of close circuit television systems comprising of camera (s) with monitor (s) and/or video recorder (s), switching, control and ancillary equipment for use in security applications.

The objectives of this standard are:

a)     To provide a framework to assist customers, installers and users in establishing their requirements;

b)     To assist specifiers and users in determining the appropriate equipment required for a given application;

c)      To provide means of evaluating objectively the performance of an installed system.

 

Email us at office@platinumsec.co.uk or visit www.platinumsec.co.uk  for further information.

 

CCTV CODE OF PRACTICE

CCTV Regulations

Under the Data Protection Act 1998, legal control over CCTV surveillance cameras in public areas came into effect on 1 March 2000. A new Code of Practice for CCTV use has been written by the Information Commissioner and sets out guidance on following good practice procedures. The Code of Practice’s purpose is to assist operators of CCTV surveillance systems in understanding their legal obligations and also to reassure the public about the safeguards that should be in place.

The Code is not intended to apply to:

  1. Targeted and intrusive surveillance activities that can only be issued in specified circumstances by the intelligence agencies, police or customs.
  2. Surveillance used by employers to monitor employees’ compliance with their employment contracts.
  3. Home security.
  4. Cameras used by the broadcast media for journalistic, artistry or literary purposes.

 

The Code of Practice

Before implementing a CCTV surveillance system, the full Code of Practice needs to be studied carefully. A brief summary follows of some of the key areas that need to be considered before implementing CCTV surveillance equipment.

 

Initial Assessment Procedure

Before you install a CCTV surveillance camera, the purpose of its intended use needs to be established. In accordance with the First Data Protection Principle, you will need to thoroughly assess the appropriateness and reasons for using CCTV. This, along with the person(s) or organisation(s) responsible for the system, needs to be documented and registered with the Office of the Data Protection Commissioner.

 

Locating the CCTV Cameras

Consideration of where your equipment is situated is a key factor when setting up a CCTV surveillance system. The way images are captured needs to comply with the First Data Protection Principle:

  1. Cameras should only cover the spaces where the equipment is meant to monitor.
  2. The user needs to consult with the owners of any domestic areas that might be covered or border the area monitored by the equipment.
  3. Operators must be aware of the purpose of the scheme and only use the equipment for that purpose.
  4. Operators should not adjust equipment to overlook spaces not covered by the scheme and should also be aware of privacy implications.

 

CCTV Signs

The public needs to be aware that they are entering an area that is being monitored by CCTV surveillance equipment. Signs should be placed so that they are clearly visible and legible. The size of the sign will vary according to the circumstances of its location.

Signs need to contain the identity of whoever is responsible for the scheme, its purpose and their contact details. There are only a few exceptional circumstances where signs can not be used, such as investigating specific criminal activity.

 

Quality

For the data that you receive from CCTV surveillance cameras to be of any use, the images produced need to be as clear as possible. Frequent checks need to be made to make sure the equipment is performing properly and if tapes are being used they need to be of good quality. If the quality of the images deteriorates to an unacceptable level, the equipment should not be used and should be replaced.

 

Processing Images

Images should not be retained for longer than necessary if they aren’t required for your purpose. Retained image integrity needs to be maintained to insure its evidential value and to protect the rights of the people who have been filmed.

Images should be erased after the retention period or stored in a secure place if being used for evidence. The reason, date, crime incident number and location need to be documented when they have been moved to another location.

Authorised employees should only be able to monitor the information from your CCTV surveillance equipment. All recorded image viewings should be restricted to a designated staff member who can decide if a third party may view the recording.

 

Access

Access to CCTV recorded images needs to be restricted and tightly controlled for Data Protection Act purposes. This means staff should only have access if they need it to achieve the purpose of the scheme. Third party access should be limited to law enforcement, prosecution agencies, legal representatives, the media (when assisting to catch a criminal) and people whose image has been recorded (unless it would prejudice criminal proceedings). All requests and reasons for denial need to be documented.

If footage is released to the media, then images of people may need to be blurred to comply with the First, Second and Seventh Data Protection Principles.

If individuals want to view recorded images of them, they need to apply to the data controller in writing and pay a small fee (max £10). The data controller must deal with the request within 40 days – even if it is to deny their application. There are some circumstances where an individual is exempt from the right of access to information. This is where the information could prejudice:

  1. The prevention or detection of crime.
  2. The apprehension or prosecution of offenders.

Individuals that feel that they have suffered unwanted damage or distress from any contravention of the Act requirements can seek compensation through the courts.

Email us at office@platinumsec.co.uk or visit www.platinumsec.co.uk  for further information.

 

Data Protection

You may not be aware of the legislation detailing the requirements of registering your CCTV System under the Data Protection Act 1998. Obligations are placed on organisations that use personal information under the Data Protection Act 1998. The act states that anyone who records and uses personal information must be open about how they use the information gathered. Under the act, the Information Commissioner’s Office must be notified if organisations process personal information (personal data), failure to notify is a criminal offence.

All relevant information can be found on the web-site of The Information Commissioner www.ico.gov.uk. You can contact The Information Commissioner’s department directly on: 01625 545745. For Registration or Notification information ring: 01625 545740.

 

CCTV Camera Image Quality Rotakin Standard

Image quality is measured against the Rotakin® standard. The Rotakin® target was developed by HOSDB (Home Office Scientific Development Branch) as a means of auditing the efficiency of a CCTV system. It consists of a human silhouette target 1.6m in height. When the target fills the screen vertically it is said to be 100%R.

There are four image standards:

     
 Monitor – Not Less than 5%R    Detect – Not Less than 10%R
     
 Recognition – Not Less than 50%R    Idenification – Not Less than 120%R

 

The quantity and location of cameras will be site specific. They must meet the requirements identified within the O.R. (Operational Requirement) procedure. All cameras must produce colour images to enable accurate identification of offenders.

All external public access doors must be fitted with cameras which enable clear, unobstructed images of all persons entering/exiting the premises. Where practicable, these cameras should be mounted internally. Such cameras must be mounted at a suitable height – looking towards, rather than down at the doorway. These cameras must be capable of producing HOSDB Identification standard images (a minimum of 450TVL resolution and 120% Rotakin® screen target height) at the monitor.

All internal cameras must be capable of producing HOSDB Recognition standard images (a minimum of 450TVL resolution and 50% Rotakin® screen target height) at the monitor.

CCTV Cameras are susceptible to interference and vandalism. Cameras should be fitted with robust anti-tamper housings to prevent such actions. All cameras must be a minimum standard of 450 TVL. They must have back light compensation, direct drive or amplification capability, and a sensitivity of a minimum of 1 lux.

 

BS 8418:2003

Code of Practice for the installation and remote monitoring of detector activated CCTV Systems.

Integrated systems – combining CCTV, Access Control and Intruder Detection – are emerging as a key characteristic of the security industry. A new Code of Practice sets out to raise the standard of their installation and operation.

Defining Moment

BS8418 – the new Code of Practice for the installation and remote monitoring of detector activated CCTV Systems – is set to both raise the standard of integrated systems and define the character of those systems too. But above all, it will drive integrated systems as a commercial opportunity. According to a BSIA survey, only 14% of premises in the UK have security systems. This suggests a huge commercial opportunity exists for the industry. The attitudes of the police and insurance industry are key in driving that figure up. Because of the waste of police time in chasing false alarms (98% of activations are false), some end users have lost confidence in the value of investing in security. However, going forward, if a user wishes to be guaranteed a level 1 police response, adherence to BS8418 will be mandatory. And where the police go, the insurance industry is sure to follow. End users will find themselves motivated by financial (ie insurance) as well as security concerns to pursue the integrated solution route.

Standard Scope

BS8418 covers the design, positioning, configuration, performance, commissioning, operation and maintenance of remotely monitored and detector activated CCTV systems. This means that the standard only covers integrated systems. It also means that it is the system and not individual products or components that comply with the standard. For instance it is not possible to purchase products that comply with BS8418.

A key purpose of adhering to the standard is to qualify for a Unique Reference Number (URN) which is issued by the local police authority to guarantee a level 1 police response. Without a URN, this level of police response is not guaranteed. It is this purpose that has led to the standard being stringent for the elimination of false alarms is a key police objective.

BS8418 Summary

Here is a bird’s eye view of some aspects of BS8418.

Field of View

The standard is adamant that camera and detector fields of view should match one another and be confined to within the site’s boundaries and not extend into public areas.

Light

PIRs facing east or west must not affected by the sun or from reflection and shadows. Only high quality PIRs must be used to avoid false triggering. Cameras should not face directly into sun or light. However, there should be sufficient light (night and day) to illuminate the cameras’ fields of view.

System integrity

Each individual detector must be uniquely identifiable to the system. All cabling and detection devices should incorporate tamper protection.

Event verification

To ‘verify’ an event, the field of view should be set so that a 1.6m high human target fills at least 10% of picture height. To ‘recognise’ an intruder the target should fill a minimum of 50%. Fixed cameras are the recommended option for vulnerable areas (e.g. the entry/exit route) or a PTZ camera with its park position viewing the vulnerable area. If PTZ cameras are used in isolation, use should be made of presets so that the operator will observe each incident as though it were viewed by a static camera.

Audio

An audio challenge facility is recommended and required to guarantee level 1 police response. The audio challenge should be audible in all areas of detection.

Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery

The installation of a back-up UPS system should be considered. The system should have the ability to monitor and indicate video loss to the RVRC (Remote Video Response Centre). Ensure that the system has an alternative signaling path to indicate failure of the main signalling path to the RVRC. The system should have a full connection and retry protocol Plan to ensure that the fully detailed event log-system history be retained and held at the protected site.

Unique Reference Number

To obtain a URN, installers of remotely monitored detector activated CCTV systems will need to comply with all of the following: –

ACPO Security Systems Policy. (Association of Chief Police Officers)

BS 8418 Installation and remote monitoring of detector activated CCTV systems – Code of Practice BS EN 50132-7: CCTV Application guidelines

The system must have the capability of audio challenge.

British and European Intruder Alarm Standards

DD243
Code of Practice for installation and configuration of intruder alarm systems designed to generate confirmed alarm conditions.

BS 8473:2006
Code of Practice for Intruder and hold-up alarm systems – Management of false alarms

BS EN 50131 Series
European Standards on Intruder Alarms

(Originally due to commence October 2005)

PD6662:2004
Guideline for the implementation of BS EN 50131-1:2004

Introduction

To help ensure that alarms are designed, installed and maintained reliably, suppliers and installers make reference to a series of British Standards and Codes of Practice. Some of these have been withdrawn and replaced by the ‘European Standards for Intruder and Hold Up Alarm Systems’ – usually referred to as the Euro Standards. The Euro Standards only apply to new systems.  Existing systems remain subject to the British Standards and Codes of Practice applying at the time of their installation; but exceptionally may need to comply with the new Euro Standards if they require such extensive re-design/equipment replacement that they effectively become a ‘new system’.

Means of Introduction

Because some of the Euro Standards relating to components are not yet published, and the Euro Standards do not cover some issues that alarms may be required to meet in the UK to satisfy the police or insurers, an enabling ‘standard’ has been prepared.  This outlines retained/additional UK requirements that apply alongside the Euro Standards and was published in August 2004 titled ‘PD6662:2004 – Scheme for the application of European Standards for Intruder and Hold up Alarm Systems’.

Timescale for Introduction of PD6662

A transition period operated until 1st December 2005, during which new alarms could be installed to previous British Standards or the PD6662 scheme.  Now PD6662 must be used.

Overview of EN 50131

The major differences between EN 50131 and the old BS 4737 are:

  1. Structured standards
  2. Grading of systems
  3. Classification of equipment
  4. Risk based

This provides a structured approach to:

  1. Assessment of risk
  2. Technical survey
  3. System design
  4. Installation of the system in accordance with agreed specification
  5. Installation of equipment in accordance with manufacturers’ recommendations.

A significant advantage for insurers and surveyors applying European Standards to systems is the specification of grades appropriate to the associated Risk. One of the major differences in the European Standards is the grading of systems, which is not a feature of BS 4737.

Security Grading

Under BS EN 50131-1:2004, intruder alarm systems will need to be Security Graded according to the kind of intruder considered likely to try to defeat the system.

Insurers are understood to support the Grading approach and it is expected that they will, in due course, recommend particular Grades of system in relation to particular premises risks.  Where this turns out to be the case, installers and customers may take the lead given by insurers, as regards the minimum Grade of system they require, and discuss whether to go for a higher Grade of system.

The grading of a system based on a structured risk analysis will determine the:

  1. Extent of the system
  2. Signalling
  3. Tamper security

Within the new European Standards there are four security grades:

  1. Grade 1 – low risk
  2. Grade 2 – low to medium risk
  3. Grade 3 – medium to high risk
  4. Grade 4 – high risk

Who Decides the Grade of Alarm? 

Installers

Installers are required to carry out a formal assessment of the theft risk to determine a suitable Grade of alarm. To do so they will consider the items at risk, existing security arrangements and any previous thefts, etc.  Before they proceed they will seek the customer’s formal approval, and may also suggest that any interested insurer be consulted.

Insurers

Depending on the risk exposure, insurers may require an intruder alarm before providing certain insurance covers, eg theft.  As the Grade of an alarm cannot be readily changed after installation, it makes sense to check a proposed alarm with any interested insurer before proceeding. Insurers may respond to a request to approve an alarm by visiting the premises, making a decision based on information already held by them, or by agreeing the outcome of the installer’s risk assessment.
Insurers will make their own decisions, but as a general guide the following is likely:

Detection and Control System

Grade 2 – Lower risk premises.
Grade 3 – Normal risk premises, ie all except those suitable for Grade 2 or 4
Grade 4 – Very high risk premises, eg cash handling centres, banks, museums.
A further inclusion in the European Standards is the classification of components that are used for the intruder alarm system installations. These will be classified, which in turn will determine where they are installed.

Detection and Control System – Grading

Apart from increasing control panel event memories and levels of recommended detection; the key difference between Grades 2, 3 and 4 is that movement sensors at Grade 3 must be able to detect ‘masking’, ie something has been placed over the sensor lens and at Grade 4 ‘range reduction’, ie something has blocked part of the detectors’ field of view.

Key Action Steps 

When having a new alarm installed:

  1. Use a reputable installer, eg one inspected by the NSI (NACOSS) or SSAIB.
  2. Co-operate with the installer’s risk assessment procedures.
  3. Check any interested insurer agrees with the proposed alarm Grade, Detection, Signalling and Response.
  4. Where police response necessitates a ‘Confirmation System’ check that the installer designs a system that has:
  5. Dual Path Signalling
  6. Confirmation from each ‘at risk’ area
  7. A ‘Means of Unsetting’ that does not prevent the police being called should an intruder force open the designated alarm entry/exit door.

 

DD243 European Standards for Intruder Alarm Systems

DD 243 – Code of Practice for the installation and configuration of intruder alarm systems designed to generate confirmed alarm conditions.

Scope:

DD 243 gives recommendations for the design, installation and configuration of intruder alarm systems that incorporate alarm confirmation technology for the purpose of signalling notification of an alarm activation to an alarm receiving centre (ARC) and requiring Police Response.

DD 243 includes recommendations intended to minimise the likelihood of false alarms.

DD 243 is intended to be read in conjunction with the Standard EN 50131 (as implemented by PD6662).

DD 243 – A summary

 

DD243 was originally introduced to reduce false alarms during setting/ unsetting and to improve the operation of alarm confirmation. It applies to all new systems incorporating confirmed alarm technology and to existing Police Response systems being upgraded to confirmed alarm technology to re-gain response.

Personal attack (hold-up) alarms whether they are stand-alone or part of an intruder alarm system are not affected by this Draft for Development.

 

System Un-Setting

DD243 allows five un-setting methods:

a) System un-set by unlocking the initial entry door.

b) Unlocking entry door disables all confirmation then system un-set internally.

c) Opening entry door disables confirmation (not acceptable to most insurers).

d) System is unset using a proximity fob.

e) Un-setting carried out in conjunction with the Alarm Receiving Centre.

 

System Setting

DD243 allows five methods to complete the setting of your system:

a) Key operated shunt lock on final exit door.

b) Push button outside the premises.

c) Door contact on the final exit door.

d) Proximity fob.

e) In conjunction with the Alarm Receiving Centre.

For both un-setting and setting Platinum Security recommend option (d) – using a proximity fob with a system keypad incorporating a proximity reader located just inside the entry/exit door. This provides a simple operation for key-holders and eliminates many alarms caused by entering incorrect user codes.

Email us at office@platinumsec.co.uk or visit www.platinumsec.co.uk  for further information.

 

EN 50131 European Standards for Intruder Alarm Systems

The introduction of EN 50131

EN 50131 was phased in to replace British Standards BS4737, BS7042 and BS 6799 and was adopted in October 2005 utilising PD 6662:2004, an enabling document which facilitated the introduction of EN 50131 into the UK.

The difference between PD6662 / EN 50131and the old British Standards

PD6662 differs from former British Standards in the following ways:

It determines not only the system but also the component design requirements for Intruder and Hold-up Alarm systems.

A comprehensive Risk Assessment is required to determine the design criteria of the system.

Applicable to both hard-wired and wire-less installations.

Grading of systems is required to reflect “the risk”. I.E. Grade 1 – Low Risk, Grade 4 – High Risk.

 

Does my existing system need to be upgraded to comply with PD6662


If your current system complies with the old British Standards and is working effectively changes are not required.

If any upgrade to your system is undertaken your insurance company will require the system to comply with PD6662.

If  you lose Police Response and the URN is withdrawn it can only be reinstated if the system is upgraded to comply with PD6662.

 

RISK ASSESSMENT

One of the most significant issues within the new EN standards will be evaluating the risk associated with the premises and determining a grade of system. This is because once the grade of a system is determined it will define the extent of the system, its signalling and tamper security requirements.

SECURITY GRADES

One of the most important aspects of the EN 50131 requirements is the concept of a security grade. For each installation the grade of system has to be chosen according to various factors. In the EN the grade is described in terms of the type of intruder and how much effort they would put into a burglary.

What are the Gradesin more detail?

Grade 1 is for an installation with a low risk of theft. The property is not likely to attract intruders. It is assumed that a thief is likely to be opportunistic rather than bothering to plan things in advance. In the application guide (DD CLC/TS 50131-7) it assumes that an intruder is simply going to break open a door.

Grade 2 is for a slightly higher risk of theft. The property is likely to have something of interest to an experienced thief. In this case the intruder is expected to have some knowledge of how alarm systems work and possibly carry some tools to allow him to overcome a simple alarm system. The thief is likely to check the building for ease of access through doors, windows and other openings.

Grade 3 is for a reasonably substantial risk property. There is good reason to assume it may be broken into and might well contain objects of high value. An intruder is likely to gain access by penetrating doors, windows or other openings. The thief could be very experienced with intruder alarm systems and possess a number of tools and equipment to overcome the system

Grade 4 is for very high-risk properties. Intruders could be expected to plan a burglary in advance and have the knowledge and equipment to alter parts of the intruder alarm system to prevent detection. It is assumed that the intruder could gain access by penetration of floors, walls and ceilings. The intruder is unlikely to be working alone.

What Grade of System does my installation need?

This is difficult to say at the moment and opinion on this matter varies from country to country. The view in the UK tends to require grades that are higher than other countries (e.g. a shop in Belgium at grade 2 could be grade 3 in the UK). To a large degree the choice of grade would be guided by insurance companies. A typical view though could be:

  • Grade 1 would only be of interest in domestic      properties (without an insurance requirement for an alarm system).
  • Grade 2 would be most domestic properties and low      risk commercial (e.g. florists)
  • Grade 3 would be for high-risk domestics and most      commercial properties (e.g. Newsagent with cigarette sales)
  • Grade 4 would be for extremely high-risk domestic      and higher risk commercial properties (e.g. bullion stores).

Mixing Components of Different Grade

The EN standard says that it is not necessary to use the same grade of component throughout an intruder system.

If the installation is a grade 2 then there is no problem using, for example, a grade 3 power supply.

If however an installer fits a grade 2 component (such as a detector) in a system then that system is limited to grade 2 at best.

It is possible to have a defined part of a system at a higher grade so long as all associated parts are at the same (or higher) grade. For example a system combining intruder and hold-up (PA) functionality could have a grade 4 hold-up system whilst the intruder parts were limited to grade 3. But this example is only valid if the power supply, alarm transmission system and warning devices used by the hold-up (PA) parts are all grade 4. This would still allow intruder parts such as PIR’s to be grade 3. The system as a whole is, of course, only grade 3.

Email us at office@platinumsec.co.uk or visit www.platinumsec.co.uk  for further information.

 

BS 8473:2006 European Standards for Intruder Alarm Systems

Code of Practice for intruder and hold-up alarms – Management of false alarms.

BS 8473 has been drawn up to assist all parties in the management of false alarms, to reduce the disproportionate level of resources being absorbed by the police, the alarm industry, customers and operators as a direct result of false activations.

Preventing false alarms: points to remember;

The intruder alarm system (IAS) is to be operated only by persons who have been correctly trained. If there is uncertainty about the correct operational procedures the alarm company should be contacted.

Before leaving the premises check that all doors and windows are physically secured. A walk around the supervised area is the only effective way of doing this properly.

Ensure that detection devices are not obstructed. In particular be careful that infra red beams and movement detectors are not obstructed by stock or other items.

If movement detectors are used do not introduce sources of heat, movement or sound into the area supervised by these detectors without informing the alarm company.

Always follow the entry/exit procedure agreed with the alarm company. Entry through any door other than the one designated should be physically prevented. Switching off the IAS is always the first task on entry.

Before entry, ensure that the means necessary to enter the premises and unset the IAS are known and available in a secure manner to the operator.

Inform the alarm company of any alterations to the premises which could affect the IAS. Do not permit people other than employees of the alarm company to make changes to the IAS. Place system on test when building immediately.

Treat the IAS with care. Wiring and detection devices can be accidentally damaged or moved. If this occurs inform the alarm company immediately.

After a false alarm, check the system carefully, and if possible, note the cause of activation. Inform the alarm company of the believed cause of the activation immediately.

Make sure regular maintenance checks are carried out by the alarm company and that you have the correct contact details for the alarm company and ARC. Remember that excessive false alarms can result in police response being withdrawn.

Most IAS require a mains electricity supply. If the electricity supply to your system is disconnected for more than 4 h contact the alarm company.

BS EN 50133-1:1997 European Standard for Access Control Systems

Introduction

This standard describes the general requirements for functionalities of an access control system for use in security applications.

It also describes general components and environmental requirements.

When a part of an access control system (e.g access point interface) forms a part of an intruder alarm system, that part shall also fulfil the relevant requirements of alarm intrusion standards. This standard addresses the security application for each access point.  An access control system may consist of any number of access points. Different levels of confidence in identification of users requesting access at an access point have resulted in the definition of recognition classes. The diversities of the market needs for access control systems have led to taking into account systems with or without logging or time logging. Access point actuators such as electric door openers, electric locks, turnstiles and barriers are covered by CEN/TC 33 standards.

Scope

This standard specifies requirements for automated access control systems and components in and around buildings.

It includes:

  1. System architecture and general requirements of an access control system for security applications;
  2. Requirements for functions;
  3. Definition of the environmental and electromagnetic compatibility conditions;
  4. Requirements for communication of an access control with others, such as access point actuators and sensors, alarm system, etc

This standard does not apply to access point actuators and sensors.

Email us at office@platinumsec.co.uk or visit www.platinumsec.co.uk  for further information.

 

BS EN 50133-7:1999 European Standard for Access Control Systems

Introduction

This European Standard has been established as a source of information for the managers and purchasers of access control systems as a guideline for the establishment of tenders and for the installers and the maintainers.

This European Standard mainly covers the people flow to, or in, Security Controlled areas and may also be used to control the flow of other things such as cars.

Scope

This standard provides guidelines for the application of an automated access control system and components in and around buildings based upon the EN50133 series of standards. It covers system design, installation, handover, operation and maintenance of access control systems. The guidelines are intended for access control systems for use in security applications.  They cover systems ranging from a simple single access point up to complex multiple access point systems. An access control system is able to actuate and monitor access point actuators and sensors (apas). However, these guidelines do not cover the apas.

The access control system may be able to communicate with other systems (e.g. an intrusion alarm system). This standard does not recommend whether or not an automated access control system should be installed in any given premises.